From the Pages of History

Stories, Pictures, Quotes & Trivia (and more) that tell the story of the world.

Archive for the tag “19th Century”

Rough and Ready’s secession


Rough and Ready is a little town of just under a thousand residents in northen California.

In 1850, it was a mining town with 3,000 residents. To avoid alcohol laws and taxation they deemed unfair, they seceded from the Territory of California and the United States! Tempers were high and a Mexican War veteran with a devoted following led the effort which resulted in the Great Republic of Rough and Ready. This was a short-lived independence, however. Dealing with complications of being a tiny landlocked foreign nation, townsfolk voted to rejoin the Union 3 months later.

Today, Rough and Ready is proud of and clings to its old Western heritage, including an annual festival known as the “Rough and Ready Secession Day,” on the last Sunday in June.

Read more, including details on the upcoming (free!) festivities, here.

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A visit to the LA Times


Pictures I took at our very cool visit to the place that the Los Angeles Times newspaper is produced. 🙂

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Some figures.

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The paper she’s holding

The paper she’s holding

This is an old printing press from the late 1800s.

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The history of this press. Click on the picture to bring up a bigger version.

The history of this press. Click on the picture to bring up a bigger version.

It was powered by water coming down this clear tube and turning the wheel.

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This is the back where paper goes in.

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This is where the new newspaper comes out.

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Paper coming off the ink-covered plate.

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Some ads in a paper printed in 1881.

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And this is going in to the facility that makes the LA Times newspapers.

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The rolls of paper they use are HUGE.

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These “robots” carry the paper rolls around the place.

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Stacks and stacks of paper!

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Yeah, that one roll is over 2000 pounds.

Yeah, that one roll is over 2000 pounds.

This is the room where they make the plates. Plates are what they now use instead of setting metal letters into a frame like they did in olden times. Once the news info comes in to this plant, the plates for the day are created there.

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A plate

A plate

Famous front pages.

San Francisco earthquake (1906), and sinking of the Lusitania (1915)

San Francisco earthquake (1906), and sinking of the Lusitania (1915)

Hindenburg explosion (1937), and New York Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire (1911)

Hindenburg explosion (1937), and New York Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire (1911)

Armistice Day of WW I (1911), and D-Day of WW II (1945)

Armistice Day of WW I (1911), and D-Day of WW II (1945)

Man first walks on the Moon (1961)

Man first walks on the Moon (1961)

Now, the ink!

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And these are the huge machines that take the paper, the ink, and the plates, and create our newspaper!

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Just look at the papers wrapped around and coming off these machines!

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IMG_9017Looking up…

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It’s not just the LA Times that’s printed here. These are some other papers printed at this location.

LatExtra, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Personal Journal

LatExtra, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Personal Journal

Newspaper not yet printed on

Newspaper not yet printed on

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And inside the trash chute…

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Defective newspapers!

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And lastly, the big room where the newspapers are packaged and set, ready to be delivered.

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This man is packaging the papers into bundles…

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…using this machine.

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The yellow spool is plastic cording that goes around each small stack of papers.


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And here are the newspapers, all ready for delivery to your house! 😀

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If you don’t read the newspaper, you’re uninformed. If you read the newspaper, you’re misinformed.

-Mark Twain

The Lost Jewel


In 1867, while working on a rented piece of land in Wisconsin, Charles Woods found a stone he mistook for quartz or topaz. It was, in fact, the 16-carat Eagle Diamond. Woods kept the diamond until he had to sell it because of financial reasons—for $1. Samuel Boyton, who acquired it, had it examined, found it to be a real diamond, and sold it to Tiffany’s for almost $800. Following World War 1, JP Morgan purchased the Eagle Diamond and donated it to New York’s Museum of Natural History. One fall day, three burglars broke in through a bathroom window and stole the diamond, as well as numerous other gems. They were quickly captured and most of the jewels were recovered, with the exception of the Eagle Diamond. Experts believe that it was resold and cut up, as it has never been recovered.

Five views of the Eagle diamond

Source: Hamilton Jewelers 

It started when…


Following the Civil War, 30%-50% of all currency in circulation was counterfeit. To combat this problem, the United States Secret Service was established.

Source: SecretService

2 pennies


With the USA’s 1867 purchase of Alaska from Russia for $7.2 million, a land rich in minerals, oil, forestry, and wildlife was acquired at only 2 cents per acre!

Care for a paper?


“If you don’t read the newspaper, you’re uninformed. If you read the newspaper, you’re misinformed.”

~ Mark Twain

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