From the Pages of History

Stories, Pictures, Quotes & Trivia (and more) that tell the story of the world.

Archive for the tag “United States”

Interesting license plates 21


TXCA GRL
W[heart]TWINS
GO4DA GL
33 SAIL
GO WOOD
FOR LIFE
LA LKRZ
F1 FREEK
NJNBLDR
GO USC
FNL RUN
8RD1DR
GOT APEX
00 ALMA
DAFFY
HEEL DWN
TO2MUCH
MARS4ME
2ND UTH
KIRK
PAPA J3
[star]MCCOOL
SATRDAY
MNSTERZ
SWETEE
TAHITY
1ALLIN1
CYR IUS
TBRD USA
NRG GEMS
GOT2[love]HM
PRESCOTT
1BAD RDE
XORDLIF
2MBAACE
MERKA
GINNY SU
R999999
HPPY ISL

The American Sniper’s longest shot


An American hero who loved God and loved his country, Navy SEAL sniper Chris Kyle was the most deadly sniper in US history, with 160 confirmed kills. His longest shot he credits to God.

In north-central Texas, Kyle grew up dipping tobacco, riding horses and hunting deer, turkey and quail — a cowboy at heart.

He got his first gun at 8 years old — a bolt-action 30-06 rifle.

The son of a Sunday-school teacher and a church deacon, Kyle credits a higher authority for his longest kill.

From 2,100 yards away from a village just outside of Sadr City in 2008, he spied a man aiming a rocket launcher at an Army convoy and squeezed off one shot from his .338 Lapua Magnum rifle.

Dead. From more than a mile away.

“God blew that bullet and hit him,” he said.

Source

Interesting license plates 20


GOT[love]4GD
18PAYTON
W8 ONHIM
TNT 4X
DGTL AGE
EZE PACE
SOO FNCY
GINNY SU
AVN LVR
QN5BOYS
BLCKPEA
GZUS[love]U2
GOD[love]ZUU
QU BE 02
15ALOHA
2015USC
SWAT 2
EAR JAM
CUTAWY J
GR8FL MN
BOAT BUM
NET DSGR
ROMN RD
EGGS CAR
O LADY
PRSB2GOD
CALC8TOR
DSNYLFE
ALNGHRN
LASTLF
HOUSES5
1GR8PL8

Unexplained Mysteries of World War II


20150525-210929.jpg -on Amazon

This book is packed with stories of strange, coincidental, unexplained, miraculous happenings of World War II. Here are a few.

-A Pole (Roman Turski) just leaving a hotel concealed a fleeing Jewish man under his hotel bed, playing dumb about him to the Nazis who were on his tail. The Pole went to war against Germany and was wounded; the surgeon who saved his life was that Jew.

-During the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, many lives were saved by 50 visiting civilian doctors who happened to be there that day to listen to a lecture.

-The reason Jimmy Doolittle’s 1943 air raid on Tokyo was so successful was that the Japanese had just finished a city-wide air raid drill in which they had put some of their own planes in the air as a protective shield. The Japanese citizens, gunners, and pilots mistook the US planes coming in to drop bombs for Japanese planes, so they weren’t fired on.

-A British spy (Henri A. E. Dericourt) who had just arrived in France wanted to locate a notorious German spy-catcher rumoured to be in the area. By happenstance, the Brit found he was that exact German’s new neighbor.

-After several foiled escape attempts from a German camp, captured French official (Lt. Pierre Lebrun) succeeded and made it to Switzerland. He’d left a forwarding address on his belongings in the camp, and astoundingly, the camp Kommandant shipped his things to him.

-Shortly after the Italian surrender, some angry Germans entered a small Italian city and started harassing the citizens. Timely American artillery shells chased the Nazis away and killed a drunk German soldier who was about to murder several Italian civilians.

-An American sailor (Joseph Kline, Jr.) wanted to accompany a chase after a Japanese sub, but he had guard duty that none of his friends would cover for him. His anger was transformed into gratitude, however, as the boats chasing the sub got into trouble and were blown up.

-During the London Blitz, Prime Minister Churchill, on the way back from inspecting anti-aircraft stations, sat in the left-hand side of his car instead of in his customary place on the right. A sudden bomb going off on the left side of the car almost tipped it over on its right side, but Churchill’s weight on the left side prevented that. He credited “a feeling of interference” and “some guiding Hand.”

-A sudden, unexplainable impulse to change seats saved not a few lives, including Lt. Gen. Mark Clark from friendly fire, and a visiting Ernest Hemingway from a German shell on the Siegfried Line. And during the Battle of the Bulge, General Patton’s “sudden inspiration” in the middle of one night, that the Germans were going to attack, led to his ordering a pre-emptive strike, which stopped a German attack that was actually coming right then.

-A newspaper executive (Amon Carter, Sr.) was part of a group brought to Germany to see the Nazi concentration camps; while there, he was reunited with a very special recently liberated POW, his son who had been captured by the Germans 2 years earlier.

God certainly does work in mysterious ways!

Clippings from Readers Digest


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-Stephen King, in the February 2015 issue, pg. 31

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-Feb 2015 issue, pg. 38

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-Feb 2015 issue, pg. 79

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-Feb 2015 issue, pg. 82

Leadership: Challenging Authority


This is a paper I wrote in college; it goes through the 16 leaders in Garry Wills’ book Certain Trumpets, and how they challenged authority or the status quo.

Challenging the status quo is often part of a leader’s job. The writers in Traditional Classics on Leadership reflect on when challenges to authority should be permissible and what those challenges should look like. The leaders in Certain Trumpets demonstrate how successful this can be when done right.

Franklin D. Roosevelt had clear ideas of what he wanted to accomplish and he sometimes “exasperated” those around him on his quest to achieve them (33). However, his unorthodox way of “[drawing] in others around him” resulted in effective, dynamic plans that worked (29).

Harriet Tubman challenged authority in a very obvious way—she actually went out and broke the law by leading slaves to freedom. But she was right in what she did because she was a legitimate leader in pursuit of moral ends and she acted justly, defying unjust leaders and tyrants.

Reform is generally opposed at first and takes a while to be implemented. That did not stop Eleanor Roosevelt, one of the most powerful advocates for the fixing of problems in America. She used tact when needed but her commitment to what she saw as necessary reform did not waver.

Diplomatic leader Andrew Young may not have been in the forefront of the civil rights movement, but his behind-the-scenes work made sure everything else ran smoothly. He was just as much a part of the fight for black equality as Martin Luther King, Jr.

If there was anyone who surprised the traditionalists, it was decisive and insightful Napoleon. His dynamic, genius way of fighting won him victories against armies much larger and stronger than his.

David was destined to replace Saul but that king fought hard to keep his position. Described by Wills as a “free spirit” who headed a “rebel band,” David possessed a warrior spirit and his daring attacks solidified his position as the new king of Israel (107).

Businessman Ross Perot used efficient ways to raise sales. His ideas on how to better business were ingenious and extremely profitable. His active management styles were somewhat abnormal, but they made for success.

Being a traditional leader, he was expected to follow Catholic customs closely, but Pope John XXIII still found ways to focus on what he felt was important. Though it made some in the church squirm, “Pope John knew that the church must always be in a process of renewal…to get back to its original inspiration” (143).

General of the Continental Army that challenged the British Empire and won America its independence, George Washington was a determined leader willing to give his all in the fight for freedom. Neither clashes with the British army nor clashes within the new American government deterred him.

Socrates was not one to shy away from confrontations. He would engage anyone who cared to talk with him on philosophical subjects. Both the Wills and Wren texts contain examples of talks he had with those of differing opinions. But he was not afraid to challenge and engage.

Due to a previous devastating sickness and her association with an influential friend, Mary Baker Eddy was not afraid to go out on a limb and start her own denomination, the Christian Scientists. She pushed through opposition to become a part of religious history.

Carl Stotz did not necessarily challenge authority, but he did confront the notion that organized baseball was only for grown-ups. He did something unconventional, he did it with his heart, and he was passionate about sticking to the original vision.

Dedicated dancer Martha Graham’s unconventional inspirations and styles resulted in the revolution of dance. Other experts were skeptical, but she ended up having quite a lasting influence in that area of the arts.

The civil rights moment would not have been the same without Martin Luther King, Jr. He directly confronted the injustices of 1960s southern America, whatever the consequences. From energetic speechmaking to direct challenges, he was unafraid to challenge the unjust authority.

Opportunistic Cesare Borgia shocked many with his “effrontery” and brutal tactics; however, it could not be denied that he got the job done (232). Flexible, a go-getter, and just plain lucky, his career was short but brilliant.

Dorothea Day was driven by a desire to help the helpless. The rough experiences she had in her youth gave her a real understanding of the conditions of the poor and she was unconventional in her desires to help them.

Some of these leaders challenged authority; some challenged the status quo or established beliefs or attitudes. They all had a goal and were able to lead followers in pursuit of it. Though not every leader has to challenge authority, it is often a part of the responsibility and should be prepared for.

The 38 United States of America?


In 1973, California State University geography professor George Etzel Pearcy suggested a redrawing of the 50 US states’ borders to rearrange large cities, and a renaming of the 38 resulting states in respect of geography and culture. His proposed map is below.

20150125-220632.jpg
Read more here on MentalFloss.

‘They’ and ‘We’


I have repeatedly told my cabinet and staff that we belong here only so long as we refer to government as ‘they,’ and never think of government as ‘we.’

-Governor Ronald Reagan (Sincerely, Ronald Reagan, 1976)

Interesting license plates 18


F1 FREEK
ELEFNT
[heart]SHADAI
K STYLE1
1FRANCA
FRDM WRX
CHEFRAD
PVMOMX3
REDUCTOR
RHEIVIN
FURIOUZ
HOROZ 20
SUZZAN
NO CODES
MANHATEN
FH FANG
POSH7
GO TEAM
SOO TYRD
ROVERS8
CHRM GRL
ELEGSPA
DORI211
PAYAPA1
#1 FAN
ALPINES
BERNIE1
DNVR FAN*
SAVE 2TH
HISBENZ
SG III
J MART

* seen in Philadelphia

Times Square and Lt. Col. Francis Duffy


On my awesome trip to New York, which I’ve been blogging about here and here, I got to visit Times Square!IMG_1058
I saw a very interesting thing there—this Cross.IMG_1093
This Cross commemorates Lt. Col. Francis Duffy, the most decorated chaplain in US military history. Lt. Col. Duffy, an Irish Catholic, served with the 69th Infantry/165th Infantry in the Spanish-American War, and in Europe during World War I. IMG_1102
The following is from SixtyNinth.net:

He was most often found along the front lines hearing confessions and saying Mass, as well as visiting and counseling the soldiers. It was by his “ministry of presence” that he had his greatest influence and became an almost a legendary figure. Once the fighting began, he often traveled with a unit first-aid station, providing physical and spiritual care to the wounded and the dying. His presence on the battlefield was inspirational. Duffy was always near the heaviest fighting, exposing himself to constant danger as he moved from unit to unit. His decorations included the Distinguished Service Cross and the Distinguished Service Medal.

Closer up.IMG_1105 IMG_1106
And there’s a statue of Lt. Col. Duffy on the other side.IMG_1107 IMG_1108
Holding a Bible.
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It’s so neat that this brave man of God is commemorated in this special, public way!

Read more about Lt. Col. Duffy at NYC Parks and SixtyNinth.

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